Today received the MyDogDNA results of Xolotl

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Stefanie's picture
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Today received the MyDogDNA results of Xolotl

Today received the results of the
MyDogDNA test of Xolotl z Peronówki
(YUKON)

https://www.facebook.com/download/405680512910884/report%20Yukon.pdf

Margo's picture
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WOW. I love such tests.

WOW. I love such tests. How and where did you do it? How much is costs?

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http://www.mydogdna.com/

http://www.mydogdna.com/

129 euro it seems. very interesting info and report.

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I'm just curious is it worth testing a wolfdog

I'm just curious is it worth testing a wolfdog for diseases/disorders which appear in other breeds? Isn't that the tests are made for specific breeds?

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Why test disorders and traits that aren’t specific to my dog bre

"Why test disorders and traits that aren’t specific to my dog breed?

Because research groups usually have the possibility to include only one or two dog breeds in their projects, the disorders and the associated genes are easily perceived as being breed-specific. However, genetic mutations have been reports to transfer from one breed to another during breeding and therefore it is indispensable to test all known disorders within all dog breeds. This approach not only helps us get the most reliable picture of the genetic health of our dogs, but also helps genetics research groups to get the data that they wouldn’t get otherwise."

http://www.mydogdna.com/faq-top-10-questions#9

It seems like they are in the process of(?) including DW as one of the tests (they are gathering samples from GSDs for this and it is listed as a GSD problem on their list of available testing: http://www.mydogdna.com/sites/default/files/files/mydogdna_tested_disord...).

Eventually it seems in this test you can combine DNA profiling, DW testing, and Malignant Hypothermia which are known problems specific to CzW (which may be already worth 129 euro), as well as a slew of other problems which have been identified in other breeds but does not imply exclusivity in those other breeds.

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You mean that by testing we will be able to dicover if...

You mean that by testing we will be able to dicover if our dogs may suffer from something else?

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Thats right - it must be done as additional test.

Ana wrote:
Test for illness of OTHER breeds, but dont test DM/DW. Not at all a "complete test for CSW

Thats right - it must be done as additional test. But there are some test which are interesting for our breed. For example about the colour, coat length and type.... It would be interesting to test more dogs for it because it shows a lot about genetic of CzW - shows things which were not tested till now... Smile

Gia
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University in Utrecht makes pituitary dwarfism test for 5 breeds

University in Utrecht makes pituitary dwarfism test for 5 breeds: GSD, CSV, SWH, White Shepherd Dog and Karelian Bear Dog.

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on the mydogdna.com it talks about patented and non-patented tes

on the mydogdna.com it talks about patented and non-patented tests - it seems that they are only able to give results of genetic testing originating from non-patented tests. In this case DM (and probably others) is not included because it has been patented by the University of Missouri...

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What does that mean? :The dog is heterozygous for this variant.

What does that mean? :The dog is heterozygous for this variant. This means that it carries one copy of a genetic variant typically associated with floppy ears and one copy typically associated with pricked ears. Such variation is seen in many
breeds, like Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, and Finnish Hound.

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It is also interesting to me...

It is also interesting to me... because there are no Wolfdogs with floppy ears. It seems there is a difference between Labradors and Wolfdogs - genes which are responsible for floppy ears by them "do not work" by CzW...

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This is why I've asked about testing wolfdogs

This is why I've asked about testing wolfdogs for diseases which appear in other breeds. Breeds which have nothing in common with our dogs. Such testing may give false results There was also something about curly coat does it mean open coat as some wolfdogs have or does it mean curly like poodles or other curly terriers or retrievers?

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the genetic testing in CzW currently 'borrow' from ..

the genetic testing in CzW currently 'borrow' from known problems in the larger GSD population - so it's pretty easy to extrapolate that if GSDs are susceptible to DM & DW, then so too must CzW. And so far the genetic tests for both of these diseases identify the same genetic mutation in both breeds.

But it is WAY more difficult to isolate a problem within the breed itself - for example, cases of PLL in CzW still remains unclear if they are isolated (not genetic) in nature, or if there are genetic mutations associated with it, and if so, if the same genes for causing PLL in Chow Chows and types of Terriers is at fault or another, unidentified mutation. so for me testing for issues that are known in other breeds (but not specifically CzW) is still interesting...

.. but based on the prick/flop ear thing, in my opinion it's not so 'mysterious' as there are floppy-earred GSD (many in american show-lines - there are even pages telling you how to post or glue your GSD's ears so they will stand) and in the past I've seen photos of purebred CzW with flopped or tipped ears before too... the genetic variants for appearance don't tell an extent, only that those variants can typically be found in dogs with (insert feature tested for)..

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Jing but in this section there was an exaple of breeds

Jing but in this section there was an exaple of breeds: Such variation is seen in many
breeds, like Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, and Finnish Hound.

GSD's have different ears their floppy ears are never like those of retrievers. Those mentioned breeds have completely different ears.

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well of course

well of course, because probably the variant has nothing to do with identification of ear shape or set on the head, only whether it's floppy or not.. Laughing out loud but it would be interesting for example to test a GSD with floppy ears and see what this result is.....

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But even looking at Yukon's ancestores

But even looking at Yukon's ancestores you could see that there was no one with floppy ears so how could he have a gene for floppy ears Laughing out loud I know that I'm talking about the ears again but this is showing the problem quite well.

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because the tests for phenotypical traits ...

because the tests for phenotypical traits (ears, snout length, etc) are not exactly like the tests for a known, specific mutated gene like in DM. It is not a single-gene, autosomal recessive test. When a dog is a DM carrier s/he has the mutated gene for which the disease is linked to, which does not exist in dogs without DM. These results are more or less conclusive.

the variants tested for in ear-erectness is not conclusive but only typing for statistical probability that the animal has erect ears or not. You can read more about the variants tested for here:
http://www.mydogdna.com/blog/ear-erectness-what-test-telling-you

What is interesting is the page says that T/T (two copies of alleles giving statistically likely pricked ears) is common in GSD. It also says about C-allele (for floppiness) "Interestingly, the C-allele of this variant is the ancestral allele frequent in wolf."

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but does that mean that it appears in dogs ...

but does that mean that it appears in dogs as a legacy after wolves or does it appear in tested wolves? Because it may explain the result of the test here but not in the tests of other breeds

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Actually, it still does explain the results of other breeds

Actually, it still does explain the results of other breeds because as is explained in the link about phenotype variation, it does not examine or conclude in the same way as single-gene tests for many autosomal recessive problems.

in other words, the variants tested for in phenotype grouping have not been determined to be the cause of whatever feature tested for. It is only a variant that is found to be statistically likely to be present when looking at a specific feature. So in other words, these variants that 'suggest' a specific phenotypical feature are not causal; they are only statistically indicative based on surveying multiple breeds.

HERE: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3192833/

is a research paper about phenotype surveying and grouping, which is more detailed and technical than the short synopsis given on mydogdna.

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So all in all it is just an interesting statistical info?

So all in all it is just an interesting statistical info?

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in regards to many of the phenotypical markers, yes

in regards to many of the phenotypical markers, yes. I think the color markers are more conclusive because there are not a lot of multiple factors in that. But skull, ears, size etc are all multi-factorial, anyway glancing at the linked research report is very interesting (they also had a group of wolves).

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I forgot about the bonitation card...

avgrunn wrote:
I know that I'm talking about the ears again but this is showing the problem quite well.

I forgot about the bonitation card. Wink In the part about ears you can find the faults F6 (half floppy ears) and F8 (floppy ears). It means that there were Wolfdogs with this fault in the past. Maybe the reason why it is not problem anymore is the size of the ears. Wolfdogs have ears much smaller (and stronger) than GSD. Maybe it is the reason why you can see Wolfdogs which are 6-8 months old but still have (half)floppy ears (although the standard says that the ears must be standing at least when the puppy is 6 WEEKS old). I'm sending you a photos via PM.

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Jing wrote about that already that the floppy part is after wolv

Jing wrote about that already that the floppy part is after wolves Tongue C/C: Your dog is homozygous for (carries two copies of) a genetic variant associated with floppy ears. This genotype is common in breeds like English Springer Spaniel, Leonberger, Saluki, and Dachshunds. Interestingly, the C-allele of this variant is the ancestral allele frequent in wolf.

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